Eduardo Sciammarella, CEO

Eduardo has had a distinguished professional career as a technology and design innovator with over 40 patents. He has worked with some of the biggest technology and media companies in the world including Apple, Microsoft, Nokia, Samsung, and Sony. His career at Sony began with winning Sony's international design competition. His career at Sony spanned ten years and included developing the patent on using a jog-wheel as a physical interaction device on a mobile phone. While working at Sony's Computer Science research lab in Tokyo he received the Japanese government's highest design achievement the "G-Mark" award. Over the last decade Eduardo has focused on launching and building several startup companies in the social mobile and sustainable e-commerce spaces.

Federico Sciammarella, COO

Federico Sciammarella attended the Illinois Institute of Technology where he received his B.S., M.S. and his Ph.D. in Metallurgical and Material Science Engineering. While in graduate school Federico had the honor of working for his father Cesar at his world renowned Experimental Mechanics lab where he did cutting edge research for companies like GM and Caterpillar.  After Graduating he worked for Alion Science & Technology (formerly the IIT Research Institute) where he worked on various Department of Defense advanced Manufacturing Projects.Currently, Federico is an Assistant Professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department at Northern Illinois University's (NIU) College of Engineering and Engineering Technology.

Cesar Sciammarella, Chairman & Founder

General Stress Optics was founded by Dr. Cesar Sciammarella, based on his pioneering work in computer controlled optical systems applied to experimental mechanics. Dr. Sciammarella holds a patent for the Holo-Moiré Strain Analyzer a breakthrough technology that brings 40 years of laboratory development out into the field and production floor. The Holo-Moiré Strain Analyzer is capable of measuring static, dynamic or transient states of deformation, and has the capacity of measuring one, two, or 3-D states of strain.